Talisayen Cove, Zambales

Of all the places I have been to this 2017, Talisayen Cove is on top of my list (well you’ll notice that I kept mentioning it in my previous posts). In fact, I visited this place three (3) times this year, first was last January, second was on the 2nd week of December, and third was last December 30, 2017, which I considered as the most memorable because I was with my family.

January 2017. My friends and I planned to stay in this place overnight and we’re able to contact Kuya Paul America.

Contact Number: 0939902539 / 09175919524

Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/talisayencove

They do not accept walk-in guests because they want to make sure that those who are coming can use their cottage and other facilities, and will not go home disappointed.We paid P6,000 (divided into 7pax). I think their minimum package is at P4,000. Inclusions are as follows:

1. Boat

2. Accommodation (cottage with 3 separate rooms

3. Kitchen/Cooking utensils

4. Free use of cooking area (charcoal included)

5. Common (but clean) rest rooms

6. Trekking

7. Free use of cooler

8. Water supply

9. Electricity until 12mn (but there is no power plug and sockets)

10. Free use of volleyball court

They also have a sari-sari store but of course, expect the items to be a little expensive than its usual retail price.

We all had a great time because all of them, who are taking care of the island, were accommodating. They even bought the meats and fishes that we asked to ensure freshness since we were coming from Manila and had to travel 5 hours. The place was also not crowded.

2nd week of December 2017, we booked again our Talisayen trip, but this time, with Kuya Joven.

Contact number: 09159599595

If what you are looking for is a camping-like tour, then I would recommend kuya Joven. P500 per person fee is inclusive of the following:

1. Boat

2. Tent (sharing for 2pax)

3. 5 gallons drinking water

4. Common rest rooms (not that maintained)

5. Scheduled water supply

6. Cooking utensils

We stayed on the other side of the island (far from the previous one where we stayed). The beach in front of us was rocky. We had a hard time cooking our food because there was no kitchen. We had no choice but to look for rocks that we can use and we also had to make fire in the sand. It was very challenging because there was no electricity. It took us 2 hours to cook our adobo for dinner. But to be fair, the caretaker and her family were really trying their best to accommodate us well. They let us borrow their monobloc table and chairs. They also gave a us hot water for our coffee.

Last week of December. As I have said, this was my most memorable Talisayen Trip because I was with my family. Although it was just a day tour, I still had a great time and I felt like it was a first time experience. We booked again our tour with Kuya Paul. We were 11 (4 were kids) and we paid P4,000. Inclusions are the same when I first traveled to this place.

Another thing that I appreciate about Kuya Paul is his honesty. My brother-in-law left his Oakley shades and he informed Kuya Paul when we were about to get off from the boat. He gave us assurance that it will be safe and that he will be returning it once he had the chance to travel to Olongapo City. Few days after our trip, he texted my brother-in-law and met with him to return the shades. Now I have another reason to recommend him and their place.

What do you have to consider when preparing your budget for this trip?

1. Transportation – If you will be commuting, ride a bus to Iba Zambales or Olongapo City then transfer to another bus to Iba Zambales. Drop off point in Zambales is Pundaquit.

2. Environmental Fee – P20 per person

3. Boat/Accommodation – minimum P4,000 or P500 per person depending on where you will book your tour and the total number of pax

4. Cottage – P350. However, cottage in Talisayen Cove (c/o Kuya Paul) is free

5. Food – you can drop by Castillejos Public Market

6. Bonfire – P150 – P300

7. Parking Fee – P100 (day tour); P200 (overnight)

8. Ice block / tube ice – P50 – P150 depending on the size. You will find a lot of stores in Pundaquit but make sure you have your cooler where you can store your ice.

What to consider when traveling?

https://mhaggiecardo.com/2017/10/04/things-to-consider-when-traveling/

How to get to Pundaquit, if you are coming from Manila (this is where you will ride the boat to Talisayen Cove)

1. Private Car

Option 1.

– NLEX Balintawak – P45

– SCTEX to SFEX/Tipo – P429

– Tipo Exit to SBMA Exit in Kalaklan – P0

– Kalaklan – Pundaquit – P0

Total: P474

Option 2.

– NLEX Balintawak – P45

– San Fernando Exit – P169

– SCTEX Dinalupihan – SFEX/Tipo – P60

– Tipo Exit to SBMA Exit in Kalaklan – P0

– Kalaklan – Pundaquit

Total: P274

Option 3.

– NLEX Balintawak – P45

– San Fernando Exit – 169

– SFEX/Tipo Exit – P25

– Tipo Exit to SBMA Exit in Kalaklan – P0

– Kalaklan – Pundaquit – P0

Total: P239

Option 4.

– NLEX Balintawak – P45

– San Fernando Exit – P169

– Service Rd from San Fernando to Olongapo – P0

– Olongapo to Pundaquit – P0

Total: P214

2. Public Transportation

– Travel to Olongapo City then Pundaquit (via Victory Liner going to Iba Zambales)

– Travel to Pundaquit via Victory Liner going to Iba Zambales)

https://www.victoryliner.com/FareMatrix.aspx

Tip: you will not find any ATM in Pundaquit, or even after Castillejos Zambales, so make sure you already have enough cash before heading to the island.


All photos below were taken during my 1st and 3rd visit to the island. I was a bit disappointed on our 2nd tour, probably because I was expecting for the same experience and location, which unfortunately did not happen. I learned after that Talisayen Cove (c/o Kuya Paul) is considered a private island that is why other contact persons (or boatmen) are not allowed to use whatever facility they have in Kuya Paul’s place.

Downside of Posting A Photo Without Watermark, And Making It Available To Public

I was browsing my photo library and found again the picture that I believe was grabbed, by one facebook user, without my permission. This actually happened few months ago, but only my friends knew about it. I decided to write this blog so you’ll be aware of the downside of posting your own photo without watermark, and of course for all of us to be reminded of proper netiquette.

Ok, so let me share how things started. I posted some photos of our trip to Talisayen Cove, and it was set to public. I am very much aware that internet users have access to these photos and it was fine with me, because the main purpose why I allowed it to be viewed by public was to inspire and encourage them to include the place in their bucket list.


Again, i know that everybody has access to my downloaded photos, however, I never really expected that someone will have the nerve to just grab and edit it, and worse, use it for travel advertisement without caring to ask for my permission. Now, here’s the catch. The text inserted in the photo was not its real location.

This is the original, raw photo that I took:


This is the edited, grabbed photo. This place is Talisayen Cove and not Nagsasa Cove:

Few minutes after I made the post in my personal account, I saw this edited photo in a travel page that I also follow. It was used in advertising an island hopping tour package. I wanted to send a comment but decided not to because I still had to do some office work from home (well, i regret not telling the person).

From what happened, the photo grabber seemed to forget some netiquette:

1. Give Credit. Using other’s photo is ok but please have the decency to give credit if you cannot personally ask for the owner’s approval to grab a photo.

2. Do Not Mislead People. The photo grabber deceived other people by marking it with a wrong location. Apparently, he posted fake information when he made an offer for island hopping. Sharing photo with wrong location is like sharing fake news.

3. Have Sense of Professionalism. He was offering a tour but he doesn’t have any original photo of the location. He also didn’t consider reaching out to the owner of the photo that he grabbed. If he wanted to offer a great deal, then he should’ve visited the place himself first and take a good photo to share with  other travelers.

What have I learned from this experience?

1. Do not tolerate netizens’ wrongdoing. My photos do not have copyright symbol nor any watermark because I am totally ok if others want to share it (well, except of course for photos of myself). I just don’t like it being used to fool other people. As i have said, I regret not telling the person that I knew what he did. He could’ve deleted it immediately if he was informed.

2. Validate carefully the travel package offers. Do not be cozened by exciting photos and cheap rates. Avail travel package only from registered travel agencies, or better yet, plan a DIY trip.

Internet now occupies a huge part of our lives. It helps us in many ways so we should use it responsibly. Let’s not abuse the benefit we get from it.